If you want to know if he loves you, it’s in his voice:
People make subtle changes in the way they speak when they talk to someone they find attractiveResearchers found voice modulations make speaker attractive to listener
Men were found to vary tone in a ‘sing-song voice’ like actor Leslie Phillips’
Men reached lower minimum voice pitch speaking to ‘less attractive’ women
By Daily Mail Reporter
Published: 19:24 EST, 27 August 2014 | Updated: 05:06 EST, 28 August 2014
When it comes to the language of love, it’s not what you say, but how you say it.
People make subtle changes in their voices when they speak to people they find attractive, say scientists. 
And these voice modulations make the speaker more attractive to the listener too, the research by Scotland’s University of Stirling found. 


Read more.
If you want to know if he loves you, it’s in his voice:
People make subtle changes in the way they speak when they talk to someone they find attractive
  • Researchers found voice modulations make speaker attractive to listener
  • Men were found to vary tone in a ‘sing-song voice’ like actor Leslie Phillips’
  • Men reached lower minimum voice pitch speaking to ‘less attractive’ women

By Daily Mail Reporter

Published: 19:24 EST, 27 August 2014 Updated: 05:06 EST, 28 August 2014

When it comes to the language of love, it’s not what you say, but how you say it.

People make subtle changes in their voices when they speak to people they find attractive, say scientists. 

And these voice modulations make the speaker more attractive to the listener too, the research by Scotland’s University of Stirling found. 

Read more.


Gretna Green: The bit of Scotland where English people go to get married
By Esther WebberBBC News
Gretna Green has been a hotspot for tying the knot since the 18th Century. But why do people still choose to walk down its many aisles?
The Scottish village of Gretna Green - population 2,700 - hosts almost two weddings per person per year.
The estimated 5,000 marriages that take place every year seem extraordinary if you consider that a mere 3,000 weddings took place across the entire county of neighbouring Cumbria - population 500,000 - in 2011.
Gretna’s status as the ultimate wedding destination comes from its position just north of the Scottish border.
In 1754, an English law stopped couples under 21 marrying without their parents’ permission. But in Scotland it was permitted for girls from the age of 12, and for boys aged 14 or older. Moreover, anyone in Scotland could marry a couple by “declaration”.
Young star-crossed lovers in England would elope and Gretna was the first town they would come to, two miles over the border. Enterprising blacksmiths set themselves up as “anvil priests”, carrying out the ceremony in return for a drink or a few guineas. One blacksmith wrote to the Times in 1843, specifying that he alone had performed around 3,500 marriages in the town over 25 years.
Several attempts were made to curb the phenomenon - which one MP for Newcastle described in 1855 as “lowering the habits, injuring the character, and destroying the morality of the people of the northern counties of England”. A year later an act was introduced to require a “cooling-off period” of 21 days’ residency in the parish in which a couple wished to marry.
In 1940 the institution of “marriage by declaration” was outlawed in Scotland and in 1977 English couples could finally get married without parental consent at 18.

Read more.

Gretna Green: The bit of Scotland where English people go to get married

Gretna Green has been a hotspot for tying the knot since the 18th Century. But why do people still choose to walk down its many aisles?

The Scottish village of Gretna Green - population 2,700 - hosts almost two weddings per person per year.

The estimated 5,000 marriages that take place every year seem extraordinary if you consider that a mere 3,000 weddings took place across the entire county of neighbouring Cumbria - population 500,000 - in 2011.

Gretna’s status as the ultimate wedding destination comes from its position just north of the Scottish border.

In 1754, an English law stopped couples under 21 marrying without their parents’ permission. But in Scotland it was permitted for girls from the age of 12, and for boys aged 14 or older. Moreover, anyone in Scotland could marry a couple by “declaration”.

Young star-crossed lovers in England would elope and Gretna was the first town they would come to, two miles over the border. Enterprising blacksmiths set themselves up as “anvil priests”, carrying out the ceremony in return for a drink or a few guineas. One blacksmith wrote to the Times in 1843, specifying that he alone had performed around 3,500 marriages in the town over 25 years.

Several attempts were made to curb the phenomenon - which one MP for Newcastle described in 1855 as “lowering the habits, injuring the character, and destroying the morality of the people of the northern counties of England”. A year later an act was introduced to require a “cooling-off period” of 21 days’ residency in the parish in which a couple wished to marry.

In 1940 the institution of “marriage by declaration” was outlawed in Scotland and in 1977 English couples could finally get married without parental consent at 18.

Read more.

jimrichardsonng:

On the Caledonian Canal in Fort Augustus this morning and it was absolutely calm. Sailboats and barges tied up for the night, nobody stirring much yet. Peaceful. Shot on assignment in Scotland aboard The Lord of the Glens with National Geographic Expeditions. @JimRichardsonNG @NatGeoTravel @NatGeo #scotland #iphonephoto

Oh, that’s so beautiful!

jimrichardsonng:

On the Caledonian Canal in Fort Augustus this morning and it was absolutely calm. Sailboats and barges tied up for the night, nobody stirring much yet. Peaceful. Shot on assignment in Scotland aboard The Lord of the Glens with National Geographic Expeditions. @JimRichardsonNG @NatGeoTravel @NatGeo #scotland #iphonephoto

Oh, that’s so beautiful!

FUN FACT: The doorknob was not invented until 1878, when Osbourn Dorsey filed a patent for a “Door Holding Device.”http://www.google.com/patents/US210764?dq=patent:210764

FUN FACT: The doorknob was not invented until 1878, when Osbourn Dorsey filed a patent for a “Door Holding Device.”
http://www.google.com/patents/US210764?dq=patent:210764

Downton Abbey in hot water over bottle blooper
Launch of fifth series of ITV period drama, set in 1924, upstaged by modern flagon of H2O in promo photo spotted by fan

Downton Abbey in hot water over bottle blooper
Launch of fifth series of ITV period drama, set in 1924, upstaged by modern flagon of H2O in promo photo spotted by fan

New Release from my friends, Billy Kring and George Wier!
Available Now at Amazon

New Release from my friends, Billy Kring and George Wier!

Available Now at Amazon

Well this is going to come in handy!

Lost in Westeros? Use the Game of Thrones rail network map | Books | theguardian.com

Well this is going to come in handy!

Lost in Westeros? Use the Game of Thrones rail network map | Books | theguardian.com

The Bonnie, Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond (July 2014)

The Bonnie, Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond (July 2014)

My niece, Melissa, Accepts the Ice Bucket Challenge

(Source: youtube.com)

#1 Hot New Release in Time Travel Romance
#2 Hot New Release in Scottish Historical Romance
What would you risk to find love?
HIGHLAND PASSAGE, a new time travel romance.

#1 Hot New Release in Time Travel Romance

#2 Hot New Release in Scottish Historical Romance

What would you risk to find love?

HIGHLAND PASSAGE, a new time travel romance.

Old Tollbooth, Edinburgh, Scotland (July 2014)

Old Tollbooth, Edinburgh, Scotland (July 2014)

I went for a walk here yesterday.

I went for a walk here yesterday.