wodaole:

A foggy hike through Holyrood Park in Edinburgh.

So gorgeous, though there were a few signs about falling rocks. Also, there may or may not have been a ghost that walked with us.

scotianostra:

An addition to the nave of Dunfermline Abbey this wk - banners placed by Lord Elgin to commemorate Bannockburn 700

scotianostra:

An addition to the nave of Dunfermline Abbey this wk - banners placed by Lord Elgin to commemorate Bannockburn 700

(Source: twitter.com)

scotianostra:

Bannockburn Live battle event

(Source: BBC)

THE BITTEN: Themed Stories Collected by Brandon Hale

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All proceeds go toward Brandon Hale’s fight with cancer,  so please consider buying a copy and sharing the link. —JL

The Bitten is the latest anthology from the authors at Raptor Retreat Press, collected by Brandon Hale. 

Whether it’s erotic, horrific or simply bloody, there is an intimacy between the predator and his or her prey, and once bitten, both are never the same again. These 28 tales encompass our most primal fears and fantasies. Stories that are amusing, poignant, sexy or acerbic, the reader, once tempted, will want to return again and again. 

This Vampire and Werewolf anthology contains stories by Trish Marie Dawson, Ana Oru’, Stephen Arseneault, George Wier, John Daulton, Jeanette Raleigh, Robert Thomas, Suzy Stewart Dubot, Randall Morris, Amelia Price (Jess Mountifield), Donna McNicol, John Peters, Randy Ingermanson, Corrie Fischer, Anna J. McIntyre, Lee Burton, Cleve Sylcox, Scott Langrel, Chris Ward, Elizabeth Jasper, WSMT3, Saxon Andrew, J R C Salter, James Rozoff, Alison Blake, Ben Cassidy, Billy Kring & K S Haigwood.

everydaylittlelittlethingsinlife:

#glasgowqueenstreet #trainstation #traveldiary #travelgram #scotland (at Glasgow Queen Street railway station)

everydaylittlelittlethingsinlife:

#glasgowqueenstreet #trainstation #traveldiary #travelgram #scotland (at Glasgow Queen Street railway station)

scotianostra:

Bruce and de Bohun by Andy Hillhouse. Marking Bannockburn 700. See it at Stirling Smith Museum and Art Gallery. Admission free.

scotianostra:

Bruce and de Bohun by Andy Hillhouse. Marking Bannockburn 700. See it at Stirling Smith Museum and Art Gallery. Admission free.


Scottish Word of the Week - The Scotsman
SPRUNT is a Victorian-era Scots word that originates from the Roxburgh region. Much as the Cromarty dialect is rich with nouns and verbs of the region’s historic fishing, so the Scottish Borders’ own dialects are redolent of the area’s farming communities.
The extinction of spurt is sad in itself, but it’s an increasingly familiar story of the pace of language. Just as “texting” and “selfies” offer a glimpse into how a technologically savvy Scotland now speaks, “sprunt” takes us back to a much simpler time.
So what does it mean? Basically: boys chasing girls around haystacks after dark. Possibly a portmanteau of “sprint” and “hunt” – such as these escapades may have felt for all involved – it not only reads like an activity straight out of a Boy’s Own manual, but it also suggests that it was done so often that “chasing the girls around the haystack” didn’t really cut it for a quick description.
You do wonder what the girls would’ve called it, though.

Scottish Word of the Week - The Scotsman

SPRUNT is a Victorian-era Scots word that originates from the Roxburgh region. Much as the Cromarty dialect is rich with nouns and verbs of the region’s historic fishing, so the Scottish Borders’ own dialects are redolent of the area’s farming communities.

The extinction of spurt is sad in itself, but it’s an increasingly familiar story of the pace of language. Just as “texting” and “selfies” offer a glimpse into how a technologically savvy Scotland now speaks, “sprunt” takes us back to a much simpler time.

So what does it mean? Basically: boys chasing girls around haystacks after dark. Possibly a portmanteau of “sprint” and “hunt” – such as these escapades may have felt for all involved – it not only reads like an activity straight out of a Boy’s Own manual, but it also suggests that it was done so often that “chasing the girls around the haystack” didn’t really cut it for a quick description.

You do wonder what the girls would’ve called it, though.

Bletchley Park: the secret is out at last

After an £8 million restoration, the code-breaking site of Bletchley Park is ready for a flood of visitors – starting with the Duchess of Cambridge

"You would never guess that this small country estate housed thousands of wartime staff and the brains that broke, among many other things, the Enigma codes" Photo: JOHN LAWRENCE

By 

So, they’ve finally cracked it. Bletchley Park, the Second World War code-breaking site in Buckinghamshire, celebrates the completion of its one-year, £8 million Heritage Lottery-funded restoration project today with a visit from the Duchess of Cambridge.
You would never guess – well of course you wouldn’t – as you cross the main road from Bletchley railway station and pass a new housing development, that this small country estate housed thousands of wartime staff and the brains that broke, among many other things, the Enigma codes. Nobody knew about it until the first book about Bletchley came out in the Seventies. Nobody visited until a band of doughty local historians fought its demolition and opened it in 1994 (10 people turned up).

The 1980s time-warp of the London-Scotland sleeper train

Every time I go to Scotland, I want to take the Caledonian Sleeper, but don’t for one reason or another. These plans for upgrading sound irresistible, though.

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Across Europe, sleeper trains seem more and more of a quaint anachronism, but the UK is overhauling an old and famous overnight route, writes Adrian Quine.

The overnight sleepers running between London and Scotland, are about to get a much needed facelift.

The Scottish Government announced this week it is jointly funding a £100m investment in new trains that promise a four-class service with a bar and bistro, sleeping pods, private cabins with beds, desks, wi-fi - even showers. Michelin-star chef Albert Roux is doing the catering.

Read more.

stolethesky:

Scottish Highlands - Isle of Skye

stolethesky:

Scottish Highlands - Isle of Skye

hierarchical-aestheticism:

This is Leanach Farmhouse in Scotland built between 1721 and 1730 and completely restored by the National Trust in 1960. Just a few years ago a survey of the cottage was carried out by Addyman Archaeology so that future conservation work is in keeping with the original house and natural materials.

hierarchical-aestheticism:

This is Leanach Farmhouse in Scotland built between 1721 and 1730 and completely restored by the National Trust in 1960. Just a few years ago a survey of the cottage was carried out by Addyman Archaeology so that future conservation work is in keeping with the original house and natural materials.

(Source: naturalhomes.org)

New Cover Reveal!

Cover artist/designer Ravven has made two beautiful covers for my Scottish historical romances.

(Source: jljarvis.com)


William Logsdail - St. Paul’s and Ludgate Hill (c. 1884).

William Logsdail - St. Paul’s and Ludgate Hill (c. 1884).

(Source: speciesbarocus, via intimesgonebyblog)

London then and now: Hybrid images show changing face of capital’s landmarks

Images taken from the early 20th century around the capital’s famous landmarks have been cleverly juxtaposed with snaps from today - and while the landscape looks vastly different there are many elements which have stayed the same. The pictures were released by the Museum of London to launch Streetmuseum 2.0 iPhone app, which is available on iTunes from today. The app guides users to sites across London, where hidden histories of the city dramatically appear, illuminated thanks to the museum’s extensive art and photographic collections. (x)

(Source: almaviva90, via intimesgonebyblog)